Open post

Weddin Mountains

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

WEDDIN MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK - ORANGE REGION

Weddin Mountains National Park
An ancient island of bushland rising up out a a sea of agriculture, it is rich in wildlife and history and a great place to go camping, birdwatching and bushwalking.

The Weddin Range rises sharply on both the northern and eastern sides with dramatic orange and ochre cliffs. In between the cliffs the plateau descends gradually to the west and is carved by many gullies.

Weddin Mountains National Park photo
Photo by Mountain/Ash

The Weddin mountains are a crescent shaped formation that rise more than 400 metres above the surrounding plains. Almost all of the range is covered by the Weddin Mountains National Park.

  • The park covers 8,361 hectares
  • The rock formations are composed of sandstones, silt stones and shale
  • A massive geological event between 350 and 370 million years ago uplifted the sediments forming the twisted and rugged mountains
  • Today the site shows how millions of years of weathering and erosion have created a much more subdued landscape
  • Vegetation varies from dense scrubland on the plateau, to woodlands on the slopes and open forest around the base of the mountains
  • The wildlife includes grey kangaroo, wallaby, wallaroo and rare species of peregrine falcons, superb parrots and regent honeyeaters.
  • Over 150 species of birds live in the Weddin Mountains
  • It is believed that Weddin may have derived from the aboriginal word for stop or remain.
  • The mountains are in the Wiradjuri people's territory and there are many signs of their long occupation
    More about Ben Hall
  • Outlaws Ben Hall, John O'Meally and John Bow used the mountains to hide out between 1861 and 1865. Other outlaws such as Johnny Gilbert and Frank Gardner were attracted to the area after the discovery of gold

Grenfell nsw photo
Photo by Wardie44B

  • The park is a little west of Grenfell and approximately 430km drive from Sydney
  • Camping and picnic areas are located near Seatons Farm and Holy Camp.

Weddin Mountains National Park photo
Photo by alden0249

Seatons Farm
Now part of the Weddin Mountain National Park it was acquired as an important example of vernacular architecture, utilising only those materials that were readily available. Built from second-hand iron, sawmill off cuts, mud and hand cut timber it was home to the Seaton family for 25 years and shows what can be achieved with limited funds and is typical of how many small farms were 50 to 100 years ago.
Weddin Mountains National Park photo
Photo by Mountain/Ash

For more information contact:
National Parks and Wildlife Forbes
Camp Street, Forbes
Ph 02 6851 4429
PO Box 774, Forbes NSW 2871
Open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday-Friday


Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogleLinkedInPinterestEmail this pagePrint this page



Featured Photo by alden0249

National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
Open post

Conimbla National Park

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

CONIMBLA NATIONAL PARK - ORANGE REGION

Spectacular shows of wildflowers in late Winter and Spring produce an amazing natural spectacle.

This unique National Park is north of the Mid Western Highway, between Cowra and Grenfell.
The park is in two sections and together make up the 7,590 hectares of diverse open woodland, low open forest and large areas of heath.

terrestrial orchids nsw photo
Photo by dorofofoto

Conimbla is well known for its spectacular wildflower displays. There is a broad range of terrestrial orchids in the park which include the recently described species "Genoplesium systenum" which is unique to Conimbla.

Fauna across the park includes large mammals such as grey kangaroo, red-necked wallaby and swamp wallaby. The is a wide range of bird life too and species include the endangered glossy black cockatoo and turquoise parrot.

The two walking tracks in the park and the picnic area are in the eastern section off Barryrennie Road and are best from Gooloogong via Kangarooby Road and Barryrennie Road from Cowra.

For more information contact:
National Parks and Wildlife Forbes
Camp Street, Forbes
Ph 02 6851 4429
PO Box 774, Forbes NSW 2871
Open 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, Monday-Friday
Or online www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/Conimbla-National-Park


 

Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogleLinkedInPinterestEmail this pagePrint this page



Main photo: Yambira Mountain, Conimbla National Park. Photo: A Lavender/NSW Government


Featured image photo by dorofofoto

National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.

Yuranigh’s Grave Historic Site

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

YURANIGH'S GRAVE HISTORIC SITE - ORANGE

Surveyor-General, Sir Thomas Mitchell said of Yuranigh "...his intelligence and judgment rendered him so necessary to me that he was ever at my elbow. Nothing escaped his penetrating eye and quick ear

The Yuranigh Grave and historic site is just off the Mitchell Highway 4km east of Molong. (3km SE of Molong Yuranigh Road, Molong, NSW 2866)
As well as the gravesite there are historic and rare Aboriginal carved trees.
Yuranigh was the famous Aboriginal guide who was employed by the Surveyor-General, Sir Thomas Mitchell to accompany him on his explorations.
One such exhibition started at nearby Boree, near Orange, in 1845 and mapped large areas of inland NSW and Queensland.
Surveyor-General, Sir Thomas Mitchell obtained government authority to fence off the grave site and he commissioned and paid for a European-style headstone. Yuranigh's people the Wiradjuri carved five trees at the site.


There is now only four trees and unfortunately the meanings of the patterns and designs are lost.

Thomas Mitchell australia photo
Photo by mertie.

Key points:

> Yuranigh lived from about 1820 to 1850

> Yuranigh was a solitary person respected by both old and new Australian cultures

> he accompanied the Surveyor-General Sir Thomas Mitchell on exploration expeditions across NSW and Queensland

> He guided Mitchell's expeditions through rugged and sparsely settled areas and through the territories of other Aboriginal tribal groups. (ww.aiatsis.gov.au/explore/articles/aboriginal-australia-map)

> In later life Yuranigh worked as a stockman in northern NSW

> Surveyor-General Sir Thomas Mitchell was known by the Molong Aboriginal people as Magy Magy

> Carved trees are now rare in NSW

> The site is unique because it shows both Aboriginal and European burial practices.

> The only known site in Australia where Aboriginal and European burial practices coexist.

> Yuranighs Aboriginal Grave Historic Site is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

> Yuranigh's grave has been listed on the State Heritage Register and is managed by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service as an Historic Site. Members of the local Wiradjuri community believe that other important Aboriginal people are buried nearby.

> Aboriginal guides - Yuranigh and Piper
John Piper, possibly from Bathurst joined Thomas Mitchell on his third expedition into the interior of Australia commencing from Boree in March 1836. The expedition proceeded to the Lachlan River. Piper proved invaluable acting as interpreter, diplomat, and guide. Yuranigh, a young Wiradjuri man from the Boree district, joined Piper on Mitchell's expedition in 1845. Mitchell regarded both Piper and Yuranigh as vital members of the party.
When Mitchell learned of Piper's intention to leave the Party in search of a wife, he was sent back to Bathurst. Yuranigh remained with the expedition until it returned to Sydney in late 1847.

Sir Thomas Mitchell Monument Cairn - Corner of Henry Parks Way and The Escort Way,  Boreee NSW Google Map

 

More info
NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service  Bathurst
Ph 02 6332 7640
Contact hours: 8.30am-4.30pm Monday to Friday
www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/Yuranighs-Aboriginal-Grave-Historic-Site  


Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogleLinkedInPinterestEmail this pagePrint this page


National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
Open post

Brisbane Water National Park

Brisbane Water National Park
This spectacular park borders the Hawkesbury River 40km north of Sydney and a little west of Gosford. It covers 12,000ha of rugged sandstone country with magnificent views of the Hawkesbury River, Brisbane Water and Broken Bay.

Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by Christopher Yardin

Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by neeravbhatt

There are a number of lookouts in the park including Staples Lookout on Woy Woy Road with views over Brisbane Water and Warra Trig off Patonga Road and Tony Doyle Lookout both with great views over Broken bay.

The park has fabulous wildflower displays from late winter to early spring. The flowers include boronias, Christmas bells, gravilleas and waratahs.
Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by Arthur Chapman

Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by Doug Beckers

Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by Happy days 09

It has a rich diversity of native animals and has populations of threatened species such as tiger quolls and koalas.

Girrakool photo
Photo by photohome_uk

Girrakool photo
Photo by Halans Picnic Area
The spot is just off the Pacific Highway opposite the entrance to the Reptile Park and has gas BBQs, picnic tables and large grassed areas. There is a fee to use this and other park facilities.

Somersby Falls Picnic Area
A great spot for a picnic where you can view the falls from the top. There is a steep track to a lookout platform halfway down the falls. Facilities include free gas BBQs, picnic tables and toilets.

Bulgandry Aboriginal Site
This spot has outstanding examples of Aboriginal sandstone rock engravings. A boardwalk covers the site for easy viewing of axe-grinding grooves and engravings of animals and figures. The best viewing times are early morning and late in the day as the low sun causes better shadows to highlight the engravings. The boardwalk starts at the end of a 250m gravel track that leads from the car park. Access is off Woy Woy road approximately 2km from the Kariong turn off.

The Great North Walk
This walk passes through Brisbane Water National Park. It is a 250km walking track between Sydney and Newcastle. It was established in 1988 as part of Australia’s  Bicentennial Celebrations. For more information go to www.thegreatnorthwalk.com

Walks in the Brisbane Water National Park
Please note that the car park opens at 8am and is closed and locked at 8pm during daylight savings and 5pm other times.

Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by neeravbhatt
Somersby Falls Walking Track

A steep track with many steps. Excellent views of falls and rainforest from observation platforms. Duration 10 minutes. Difficulty hard, due to large number of steps.

Piles Creek Loop
Start and finish from Girrakool picnic area. It follows a the deep gorge of Piles Creek and has many nice picnic spots. Distance 5km. Difficulty medium.

Girrakool Loop Track
A short and easy walk which starts and finishes from Girrakool picnic area. It has scenic views over waterfalls and during late winter and early spring is a great place to see colourful wildflowers. Aboriginal rock engravings can be seen at the start of the walk and we recommend that you stop at for photos at Illoura Lookout and the shady waterfall at Andamira Lookout. Distance 2km. Difficulty easy.

Patonga to Pearl Beach
This walk follows the Great North Walk through Brisbane Water National Park. As this walk begins and ends at a beach having you swimmers and a towel is a great idea. Starting from the end of Patonga Beach you follow the signs to the national park. follow the trail past Warrah lookout with commanding views of the Hawkesbury River and the Pacific Ocean. Then follow the Peal Beach signs past sandstone caves, native hanging ferns and all the while you sould be on the lookout for bush turkeys and kookaburras. The exit is marked at Crystal Avenue which you take to Pearl Beach. Distance 4.2km. Difficulty medium.

Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by neeravbhatt
Brisbane Water National Park photo
Photo by Christopher Yardin

More information about Brisbane Water National Park
National Parks and Wildlife
Suites 36-38, 207 Albany Street North, Gosford NSW 2250
Ph 02 4320 4200
www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au

Photo by kjsydney

Scroll to top
error: Content is protected !!