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DUBBO HERITAGE TRAILS

Dubbo Travel Guide - Orange NSW

DUBBO HERITAGE TRAILS

Dubbo Visitor Information Centre

SOCIETY & CULTURAL TRAIL

Did you know that if it weren’t for a wealthy businessman and his complicated love life Dubbo might not have gotten its first hospital? Did you know that the flood in 1955 left 4,000 people homeless and that emergency supplies had to be parachuted in by the air force? Learn how a village overcame its many obstacles to become a city as you retrace important moments of Dubbo’s past. Pick up a map from the Dubbo Visitor Information Centre.

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CRIME & JUSTICE TRAIL

Did you know that Dubbo was amongst the first places in Australia to use fingerprints to catch crooks? Or that Australia’s worst serial killer once roamed its streets? That the underworld queen Kate Leigh was Dubbo born and bred? Or that the bushranger John Dunn was caught while trying to break into Dubbo Gaol? Discover these and other fascinating stories as you explore the murky underbelly of Dubbo’s past. Pick up a map from the Dubbo Visitor Information Centre.


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National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.

GOLD DISCOVERY

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

FIRST GOLD DISCOVERY NEAR ORANGE

First gold discovery at Ophir near Orange

Several people had found gold in New South Wales before the success claimed by E.H. Hargraves. They included a shepherd named McGregor who resided in the Wellington district, Assistant Surveyor J W.B. Clarke, and Count Strzelecki the Polish explorer.

The authorities took no action about these finds because gold had not been a desirable product in a convict colony. In 1851 it was wanted to offset the attractions of California which was taking migrants from New South Wales and partly because the cessation of transportation had encouraged entrepreneurs to look more favourably on the colony.
This created a need for new capital sources News of the gold strike by Hargraves in 1851 did not break suddenly.

At first there were only rumours but these gathered strength and were finally verified. Many people were sceptical about the alleged benefits of the find but their fears about labour shortages and rising wages were swept aside as men of all ranks realised that they might win riches at the diggings far beyond what they could earn at their normal occupations.

The rush started and Bathurst was the destination of the hordes that streamed towards Ophir. The story of gold discovery first appeared in the "Bathurst Free Press" and then the"Sydney Morning Herald" and it contains a reference to John Lister who was one of Hargraves' assistants that he recruited at Guyong, about half way between Bathurst and Orange. The others were James and William Tom.

When Hargraves was acknowledged as the discoverer of payable gold in New Wales by the government, Lister and the Toms began a long agitation to correct an injustice. They claimed to have found gold in payable quantities after Hargraves had temporarily retired from the search because he had achieved only disappointing results at his first try in February, 1851. Their find was made on April 7 when Hargraves was at his home in Gosford. They notified Hargraves who returned bringing with him the Government Geologist, Samuel Stutchbury. In Stutchbury's presence Hargraves panned gold at Yorkey's Corner on Lewis Ponds Creek the site that Lister and the Toms had indicated Stutchbury thereupon reported to his superiors in Sydney that Hargraves had found payable gold and on that statement he was acknowledged by the government.

In 1895 an inquiry was conducted by a committee of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly, to investigate the Lister and Tom complaint. Its decision was in their favour. Ironically, John Lister died on the day that he was to give evidence but his widow received his share of the money that was subsequently paid as compensation. It was little, however, only £1,000 to be shared by her and the Tom brothers.


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National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.

Bathurst – History

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

Bathurst - the arrival of the Europeans 1813

The first Europeans walked the Bathurst plains in 1813 and were Assistant Surveyor George Evans  and the members of his exploration team. The group included James Burns or Byrnes, John John Grover and John Tygh (or Tye).

The expedition left Emu Ford on the Nepean River near Penrith on November 20, 1813 and followed the tracks of the earlier explorers Gregory Blaxland, William Lawson and William Wentworth across the Blue Mountains.

After the crossing in early December, they It then proceeded along a rivre course which Evans named Fish River. Evans also found and named Sugarloaf, O'Connell Plains and Macquarie Plains, the Campbell River and Macquarie Rivers and Bathurst and Mount Pleasant Plains.

The main river was called Wambool by the aborigines but Evans was unaware of this and named it after Governor Macquarie.

The party returned safely to the Nepean River on January 8, 1814.

Evans' favourable account of what he had found encouraged the Governor Lachlan Macquarie, to settle the "new country". He commissioned William Cox a magistrate and landowner of Windsor, to take a party of convicts and build a road from Emu Ferry to the Bathurst plains.

Work started on July 18 and the was completed by January 14, 1815. Much of the construction was difficult but in other places little more was required than to find the best line and make basic improvements to it. Even so Cox's party performed one of the greatest feats of labour in Australian history an effort that is almost miraculous.

Cox chose the site of Bathurst and It developed at the place on the banks of the Macquarie River where he located his depot, the terminus of the road party and it was there that Macquarie formally declared the settlement's existence.

Macquarie arrived on an inspection of the new road and depot on May 4, 1815 and on May 7 he assembled the whole population, raised the flag, ordered a volley to be fired, and the site of the future town of named in honour of the Secretary of State for War and the Colonies, Lord Bathurst.

Seventy-five people were present thirty-six had which he come with the Governor in his retinue and the others were convicts, soldiers and civil officers whose duties required them to reside at the depot.

The proclamation site was on the left bank of the river and around the flagpole and where the official settlement developed. When free settlers arrived they were restricted to the right (eastern) bank and so an unofficial village began to take shape to cater for the normal needs of the community.

Every years Bathurst celebrates Proclamation Day. MORE INFO 

The first group of agricultural grantees were James and John Blackman, Richard Neville. William Thomas Kite, Thomas John Godden George Cheshire and John Abbott, who were located on small farms along the river. They came in 1818. Macquarie favoured men of this kind, free settlers and ex-convicts of good character because he thought that ultimately they would serve the country better than the pastoralists.

They were supposed to be the first of many but Macquarie's policies were changed by his successor Sir Thomas Brisbane, and the expected numbers did not come.

The centre of the eastern village was the place where roads and tracks converged. The main ones were the road from Sydney which originally followed the Fish River and the Macquarie but soon struck across the plains from the crossing place where the village of O'Connell later developed; the track to the limekilns; and the road to the ford and the western bank of the Macquarie River. After 1827 these were joined by Major Sir Thomas Mitchell's new road from Mount Lambie, which is now the highway to Sydney. On the government side the earliest roads were towards the south and Queen Charlotte's Vale (now Perthville) but soon there were tracks leading north and west.

Bathurst Court House © Regional Showcase

The hot air ballooning capital of Australia - Canowindra

National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
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Montefiores Wellington NSW

Wellington NSW Guide

Historic Montefiores

Mitchell Highway. Wellington NSW

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Lion of Waterloo Hotel, Montefiores, Wellington - © Art of the Journey 2017

Now a nearby "suburb" of Wellington, Montefiores was once a private village and is actually older than Wellington.

It was established in the 1830s by the Joseph Montefiore wealthy merchant who arrived in Sydney on the passenger ship Jupiter in 1829 with the intention of "investing £10,000 in the wool industry and the cultivation of drugs".

Joseph Montefiore was a colourful colonial character whose business interests included banking, copper mining, importing, general merchants, shipping agents, land speculation. He was a free trade politician, a benefactor and Jewish community leader. Read more about Joseph Montefiores.

Montefiores picked a good location for his village, on the Macquarie River at a spot where all traffic and provisions had to cross. The historic Lion of Waterloo Hotel was where Cobb & Co coaches changes horses and where passengers could refresh before continuing their journey north to Dubbo or south to Orange and Bathurst.

The Cobb & Co horses were spelled across the road in Teamster Park which is now a nice little picnic spot.

The hotel still caters for travellers and locals and treasures its historic beginnings in 1842 when it was built with cypress pine longs and corrugated iron.

It is said that the hotel was where the last known duel was fought in Australia. Apparently two drunk end police magistrates decided that pistols in the pub where a better solution than a courtroom battle.

The inn today...

Discover historic Wellington landmarks, take the self guided Montefiores Heritage Drive

Discover the history of:
Macquarie River Bridge
Railway Bridge
Lion of Waterloo Hotel
Teamsters Park
Oxley Park
Duke of Wellington Bridge
Maynggu Ganai Historic Site
Pioneer Cemetery
Old Sydney Road
Wellington Cemetery
Market Gardens
Show Ground
Caledonian Brick Works
Mount Arthur
Mount Wellesley
The Old Reservoir

Get the brochure from:
Wellington Visitor Information Centre
Cameron Park Nanima Crescent
Wellington NSW 2820
Ph 1800 621 614

National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.

Yuranigh’s Grave Historic Site

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

YURANIGH'S GRAVE HISTORIC SITE - ORANGE

Surveyor-General, Sir Thomas Mitchell said of Yuranigh "...his intelligence and judgment rendered him so necessary to me that he was ever at my elbow. Nothing escaped his penetrating eye and quick ear

The Yuranigh Grave and historic site is just off the Mitchell Highway 4km east of Molong. (3km SE of Molong Yuranigh Road, Molong, NSW 2866)
As well as the gravesite there are historic and rare Aboriginal carved trees.
Yuranigh was the famous Aboriginal guide who was employed by the Surveyor-General, Sir Thomas Mitchell to accompany him on his explorations.
One such exhibition started at nearby Boree, near Orange, in 1845 and mapped large areas of inland NSW and Queensland.
Surveyor-General, Sir Thomas Mitchell obtained government authority to fence off the grave site and he commissioned and paid for a European-style headstone. Yuranigh's people the Wiradjuri carved five trees at the site.


There is now only four trees and unfortunately the meanings of the patterns and designs are lost.

Thomas Mitchell australia photo
Photo by mertie.

Key points:

> Yuranigh lived from about 1820 to 1850

> Yuranigh was a solitary person respected by both old and new Australian cultures

> he accompanied the Surveyor-General Sir Thomas Mitchell on exploration expeditions across NSW and Queensland

> He guided Mitchell's expeditions through rugged and sparsely settled areas and through the territories of other Aboriginal tribal groups. (ww.aiatsis.gov.au/explore/articles/aboriginal-australia-map)

> In later life Yuranigh worked as a stockman in northern NSW

> Surveyor-General Sir Thomas Mitchell was known by the Molong Aboriginal people as Magy Magy

> Carved trees are now rare in NSW

> The site is unique because it shows both Aboriginal and European burial practices.

> The only known site in Australia where Aboriginal and European burial practices coexist.

> Yuranighs Aboriginal Grave Historic Site is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

> Yuranigh's grave has been listed on the State Heritage Register and is managed by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service as an Historic Site. Members of the local Wiradjuri community believe that other important Aboriginal people are buried nearby.

> Aboriginal guides - Yuranigh and Piper
John Piper, possibly from Bathurst joined Thomas Mitchell on his third expedition into the interior of Australia commencing from Boree in March 1836. The expedition proceeded to the Lachlan River. Piper proved invaluable acting as interpreter, diplomat, and guide. Yuranigh, a young Wiradjuri man from the Boree district, joined Piper on Mitchell's expedition in 1845. Mitchell regarded both Piper and Yuranigh as vital members of the party.
When Mitchell learned of Piper's intention to leave the Party in search of a wife, he was sent back to Bathurst. Yuranigh remained with the expedition until it returned to Sydney in late 1847.

Sir Thomas Mitchell Monument Cairn - Corner of Henry Parks Way and The Escort Way,  Boreee NSW Google Map

 

More info
NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service  Bathurst
Ph 02 6332 7640
Contact hours: 8.30am-4.30pm Monday to Friday
www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/Yuranighs-Aboriginal-Grave-Historic-Site  


Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogleLinkedInPinterestEmail this pagePrint this page


National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
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