Banjo Paterson Australian Poetry Festival

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

THE BANJO PATERSON AUSTRALIAN POETRY FESTIVAL


Banjo Paterson’s Waltzing Matilda is known worldwide; many Australians can recite a string of his poems; and his work has been converted to song and theatre. What better way to celebrate this great Australian’s life and work than through a Festival in the district in which he was born.


Banjo Paterson Cottage "Emmaville"
Orange Botanic Gardens

A celebration of Banjo Paterson birthplace.

This cute little cottage could have been where Banjo Paterson was born. It is not known for sure if it is, however, the building does come from the farm where he was born and even it is not his birthplace it would have been in a cottage just like Emmaville.

Emmaville Cottage has estimated to date from the 1850s and the four-room design is typical of early Australian rural architecture. It was located on the property of 'Narrambla', a noteworthy landholding of the Orange district in the l830s and is significant to Australian literature and history as the birthplace of Andrew 'Banjo' Paterson who was born in February 1864.

ln 2013 an extensive restoration process was undertaken by the Orange Rotary Club, the Community and Orange City Council. The cottage, missing its lean-to and outbuildings was relocated to the Orange Botanic Gardens precinct as part of the restoration.



Emmaville Cottage

Yellow Box Way, Orange Botanic Gardens Precinct
Open Weekdays 9am - 3.30pm and weekends weather permitting
Free Entry
Emmaville Cottage has approximately 4 steps with access on a gravel surface.

For further information and brochure contact:
Orange Visitor Information Centre
Free Call 1800 069 466
Email museum@orange.nsw.gov.au

Location Map

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National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.

Cook Park Orange

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

Cook Park Orange
Open every day of the year from 7.30am until dusk. Entry free. Bus groups welcome.

Cook Park Cannon

This 24 Pound Smooth Bore Cannon, (serial no. 69919) was cast c1806 at the Carron Iron Foundry in Scotland. It is a Blomefield Pattern Iron Gun and once formed part of the Fort Macquarie armament that was situated at the end of Bennelong Point, where the Sydney Opera House now stands.

Three sides of the fort faced the harbour with 24 pounders placed at each angle and mounted on a raised circular bastion, with a traversing carriage.

Cannons were standard artillery for their day and were used extensively in naval service and shore batteries and forts. It is estimated the range of the gun was approximately 1.3 kms (1500 yards) with a charge of 11 pounds of gunpowder. The weight of the gun is approximately 1 tonne and the shot weighed 24 pounds, hence the name.

This is one of the only four remaining cannons from Fort Macquarie - one is at Hyde Park Barracks and two are located at Victoria Barracks, Sydney. The cannon was given to the City of Orange in 1904 by Sydney City Council. It bears the initials G3R, indicating it was made in the reign of George III (1751-1820).

Fort Macquarie was built on the end of Bennelong Point, where the Sydney Opera House now stands. Completed by convict labour in 1821 using stone from the Domain, the fort had 15 guns and housed a small garrison. The powder magazine beneath the tower was capable of storing 350 barrels of gunpowder. The fort was demolished in 1901 to make way for the tramway sheds that occupied the site until the construction of the Utzon masterpiece.

Begonia Conservatory

C. W. Curran, a local storekeeper is claimed to have been the first person to introduce Begonias to Orange. Alf Blowes, who was Mayor at the time, showed interest in these plants and was instrumental in the building of the Conservatory in 1934. The central lantern of the building has 'Blowes Conservatory' in leadlight across its side.
The Conservatory is currently undergoing careful restoration and is not open.

The first begonias were donated by the City of Ballarat from the Ballarat Gardens and have been supplemented by the purchase of additional varieties. The collection is on display in the Blowes Conservatory from February until April each year when the plants are flowering.Cook Park's History
In 1873 the site of Cook Park was proclaimed as a park and in 1882 was officially named in honour of Captain James Cook.
From the 1870s onwards the first trees were planted resulting in today’s mature specimens. Andrew Patterson was the first curator employed in 1887.
Cook Park was laid out with straight paths and rows of trees, with much of the original design still in place.

Bastick Cottage in the Park

The Caretaker's Cottage was built in 1887 at a cost of £185.
It was named Bastick Cottage to honour two former Parks and
Gardens Supervisors who, between father and son, gave 90 years
of service to Orange. The cottage now houses the Park Guildry,
which operates as an arts and crafts shop.

The Fountain

The fountain was donated to the people of Orange by local storekeeper James Dalton in 1989 and it’s always held pride of place in Cook Park. The historic fountain includes a lot of decorative detail, including four cherubs and two overflow bowls.

Location Map

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National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.

Banjo Paterson Cottage Orange

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

Banjo Paterson Cottage "Emmaville"
Orange Botanic Gardens

A celebration of Banjo Paterson birthplace.

This cute little cottage could have been where Banjo Paterson was born. It is not known for sure if it is, however, the building does come from the farm where he was born and even it is not his birthplace it would have been in a cottage just like Emmaville.

Emmaville Cottage has estimated to date from the 1850s and the four-room design is typical of early Australian rural architecture. It was located on the property of 'Narrambla', a noteworthy landholding of the Orange district in the l830s and is significant to Australian literature and history as the birthplace of Andrew 'Banjo' Paterson who was born in February 1864.

ln 2013 an extensive restoration process was undertaken by the Orange Rotary Club, the Community and Orange City Council. The cottage, missing its lean-to and outbuildings was relocated to the Orange Botanic Gardens precinct as part of the restoration.


Emmaville Cottage

Yellow Box Way, Orange Botanic Gardens Precinct
Open Weekdays 9am - 3.30pm and weekends weather permitting
Free Entry
Emmaville Cottage has approximately 4 steps with access on a gravel surface.

For further information and brochure contact:
Orange Visitor Information Centre
Free Call 1800 069 466
Email museum@orange.nsw.gov.au

Location Map

Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogleLinkedInPinterestEmail this pagePrint this page


National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.

Cook Park Begonia Display Orange

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

Cook Park Begonia Display

C. W. Curran, a local storekeeper is claimed to have been the first person to introduce Begonias to Orange. Alf Blowes, who was Mayor at the time, showed interest in these plants and was instrumental in the building of the Conservatory in 1934. The central lantern of the building has 'Blowes Conservatory' in leadlight across its side.
The Conservatory is currently undergoing careful restoration and is not open.

The first begonias were donated by the City of Ballarat from the Ballarat Gardens and have been supplemented by the purchase of additional varieties. The collection is on display in the Blowes Conservatory from February until April each year when the plants are flowering.

Cook Park
Open every day of the year from 7.30am until dusk. Entry free. Bus groups welcome.

Cook Park's History
In 1873 the site of Cook Park was proclaimed as a park and in 1882 was officially named in honour of Captain James Cook.
From the 1870s onwards the first trees were planted resulting in today’s mature specimens. Andrew Patterson was the first curator employed in 1887.
Cook Park was laid out with straight paths and rows of trees, with much of the original design still in place.

Bastick Cottage in the Park
The Caretaker's Cottage was built in 1887 at a cost of £185.
It was named Bastick Cottage to honour two former Parks and
Gardens Supervisors who, between father and son, gave 90 years
of service to Orange. The cottage now houses the Park Guildry,
which operates as an arts and crafts shop.

The Fountain
The fountain was donated to the people of Orange by local storekeeper James Dalton in 1989 and it’s always held pride of place in Cook Park. The historic fountain includes a lot of decorative detail, including four cherubs and two overflow bowls.

Location Map

Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogleLinkedInPinterestEmail this pagePrint this page


National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
Open post

Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mount Tomah

Blue Mountains Botanic Garden, Mount Tomah.

This superb garden has been developed to display cool-climate plants from around the world to complement the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney. Special emphasis is given to Southern Hemisphere plants and their relationship. It is administered by the Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust.

Bells Line of Road, Mount Tomah NSW
Ph 02 4567 3000
Email tomah@rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au
www.bluemountainsbotanicgarden.com.au

Free entry. Open Monday - Friday: 9.00 am - 5.30 pm, Saturday, Sunday and public holidays: 9.30 am - 5.30 pm. Closed Christmas Day

Facilities - Restaurant, accommodation, Botanists Way Discovery Centre, walks, toilets, picnic spots, gallery, visitor information, plant sales, parking

DSCN3016

About the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden

The Blue mountains Botanic Garden, Mount Tomah sits on a basalt peak 1000 metres above sea level in the World Heritage Listed Greater Blue Mountains. The Gardens cover 28 hectares and is home to thousands of species of cool climate and southern hemisphere plants and is the highest botanic garden in Australia.

As well as many beautiful landscaped gardens and rainforest walks the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden runs events and workshops to inspire a love of plants. It is a stunning wedding location and offers accommodation in the Jungle Lodge.

Suggested 30 minute and 1 hour walks may be found on the map signs around the garden.


How the gardens are arranged

Plants at Mount Tomah are grouped according to their geographical origin and these are grouped into thirteen 'Feature Gardens' are where you see similarities and differences and learn about evolution of flora from different continents.
Call into the Visitor Information desk just inside the main entrance for a garden map and information about the gardens and the Blue Mountains Region.

Southern Hemisphere Woodland

Features diverse woodland includes species that represent Gondwanan and the Southern Hemisphere with plants from Australia, Chile, Peru, New Zealand, New Caledonia and Africa.

Conifer species

Conifers flourish at Mount Tomah with many unusual species when and an impressive collection of conifers in this feature in this section.

Bog Garden

The Bog Gardens is a hanging swamp with a unique wetland habitat and is typical of hanging swamps in damp cavities on hillsides and cliff edges providing damp conditions loved by ferns and mosses.

Daffodils in the Brunet Meadow

This is a grassy glade with mature trees and shrubs and includes a collection of conifers.

Proteaceae

The Proteaceae family includes waratahs, banksias, grevilleas and proteas. The Proteaceae feature garden is home to many bright and colourful waratahs, and African plants, like the Gazaland protea of Zimbabwe and the curious clasping-leaf sugarbush.

Remnant Rainforest

Explore a pristine rainforest and see giant tree-ferns, sassafras, coachwood, blackbutt, brown barrel and other trees growing in their natural state. Easily accessible using the Lady (Nancy) Fairfax Walk.

Rhododendron Species

In spring the rhododendrons bloom in all colours, forms and sizes all with wonderful fragrances.  

Formal Garden

Inspired by traditional European styles, is laid out in three terraces. The Herb Garden has plants arranged in simple geometric beds, reminiscent of early monastery and university gardens. The Rose Garden has an intimate collection of modern and heritage roses. The Lawn Terrace recalls formal 17th-century gardens, with manicured lawns and clipped hedges. In contrast, the colourful Pergola Terrace is based on 19th-century English herbaceous borders. The Formal Garden is wheelchair-accessible.

Conifer Cultivars

A graceful collection of conifer cultivars selected for their superior horticultural features, like plant shape, growth form and foliage colour.

Residence Garden

Near the Visitor Centre showcases modern domestic landscaping and features a sweeping lawn of rye and fescue grass with handsome specimen trees.

Eurasian Woodland

During autumn, this collection of evergreen and deciduous trees from Eurasia puts on a dazzling colour display.

Heath and Heather Garden

A miniature world of texture and colour in this pretty garden displaying colourful tapestry of heaths and heathland plants from the Northern Hemisphere, Africa and Australia.

North American Woodland

The 'fall' season (autumn) is a blaze of colour in the deciduous section and features graceful trees including  maple and beech.


Tree Ferns

There are two species of tree fern that occur on Mount Tomah. Both species are planted around the Visitor Centre. Cyathea australis (black or rough tree fern) is found on higher slopes. Frond bases are covered with dark, shiny scales. The local Aboriginal people used the stems of young fronds to make a tonic to use after illness.

Dicksonia antarctica (brown or soft tree fern) is found in sheltered gullies. Frond bases are covered with coarse red-brown hairs. The pith from the centre of the trunk was eaten by Aboriginal people.

Their roots are very close to the surface and do not spread far from the main trunk. When growing tree-ferns, use of a good quality organic fertiliser and well rotted animal manure - will keep the soil moist and provide nutrients to ensure healthy and vigorous growth.


The Waratah, the state emblem of New South Wales

The NSW floral emblem, the Waratah, grow extremely well at Mount Tomah. The Waratah has a long association with New South Wales and was adopted in 1962 as the official state floral emblem.

In the early years of last century there was a heated debates about the relative merits of the Golden Wattle and the Waratah as the national floral emblem. Those in favour of the wattle (mainly residents of Victoria and South Australia) argued that as the Waratah grew only in New South Wales, it was less suitable than the more widely distributed wattle. Although it is true that "Telopea speciosissima" (the New South Wales Waratah) is almost confined to the Sydney region.


History of Mount Tomah

Mount Tomah was named Tree Fern Hill by the botanical explorer George Caley (1770-1829), who was the first European to visit the area. "Tomah" reputedly means tree fern in the language of the Darug Aboriginal people whose tribal lands included this area.

National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
Open post

Orange Botanic Gardens

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

ORANGE BOTANIC GARDENS

ORANGE BOTANIC GARDENS

The gardens cover 17 hectares on what was originally Clover Hill Farm on the northern side of Orange. The gardens are part of the vision for the region designed by the Bathurst Orange Development Corporation (BODC) in 1981. With the demise of the BODC the baton was passed to the Orange City Council who together with Friends of the Orange Botanic Garden and other volunteer groups operate this great asset of the city and the region.

Self-guided walk brochures are available from dispensers just inside the entrance:

The "country walk" winds through the gardens and takes you through and past all the gardens features. Allow 30 to 45 minutes to see all the main features.

Here are some of the standouts:

Entrance Archway

This was donated by the Orange Garden Club in 1999 and its steel and blue stone provide a year round contrast to the multi colour vegetation the greet you at the entrance to the gardens.

Weeping Elm Lawn

A few steps along from the entrance archway on the right is a formal lawn area with a spectacular weeping elm which is often used as a backdrop for wedding ceremonies. Children lover to hide under the branches when it's in full leaf. In autumn it is stunning.

Sensory Garden

This area is designed to provide sensory pleasure for all visitors and has disability access.

Fruit Orchard

Orange has been an important fruit growing area since the early 1900s and the orchard has heritage varieties of apples, crab apples and pears. Some of the old varieties have been budded from the original Macarthur orchard at Belgenny Farm.

Richard Niven Meadow

Remnant Yellow Box and Apple Box Eucalypts line the southern side of the meadow.

Magnolias

Over 20 varieties of magnolia grow under remnant Eucalypts on the northern side of the Country Walk. They flower in early spring and autumn putting on a spectacular display.

 

Sundials

Within the Orange Botanic Gardens, there is a fascinating sundial feature. They are located on a small rise in the centre of the gardens.

The sundials were donated by the Friends of the Orange Botanic Gardens in 1998 to mark the occasion of the 10th Anniversary of the official opening of the Gardens. (See the detailed brochure available from the Orange Visitor Information Centre.)

obg-sundial-brochure-sml

The Horizontal Sundial at the Orange Botanic Gardens.
The latitude of the Gardens is 33 degrees, 15.5 minutes south of the equator so that angle is set between the top surface of the solid triangular gnomon (the raised part of a sundial that casts a shadow) and the horizontal dial plate containing the hour scale of the sundial.

The longitude of the Australian Eastern Standard Time Zone is 150 degrees East of Greenwich. The longitude of the gardens is 149 degrees, 5 minutes East. This corresponds to a time difference of 3 minutes 38 seconds and this difference has been incorporated into the time correction graph on the sundial.

The Analemmatic Sundial at the Orange Botanic Gardens.
Unlike horizontal sundials, Analemmatic sundials have a movable gnomon and in the gardens example the gnomon has been designed to be a person and is therefore called a 'sundial of human involvement'. So, when you stand on the marked spot your shadow tells the time.

Analemmatic Sundial photoPhoto by silver marquis

Federation Arch and sculptures

A superb example of the sculpture of Bert Flugelman it was commissioned by the Orange Regional Arts Foundation to commemorate the Centenary of The Federation of Australia.

In the billabong and on the small hill opposite are more sculptures by other artists that you should not miss.

Heritage Rose Garden and Old Church

Through a lichgate is spectacular heritage rose gardens which surround the historic little country church and is a much photographed and visited part of the gardens.

IMG_0690-small

Orange Botanic Garden

1 Yellow Box Way, Orange NSW 2800
Open Monday to Sunday 7 am to sunset. 
Entry free.


Share with:

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National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
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