Bathurst – History

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

Bathurst - the arrival of the Europeans 1813

The first Europeans walked the Bathurst plains in 1813 and were Assistant Surveyor George Evans  and the members of his exploration team. The group included James Burns or Byrnes, John John Grover and John Tygh (or Tye).

The expedition left Emu Ford on the Nepean River near Penrith on November 20, 1813 and followed the tracks of the earlier explorers Gregory Blaxland, William Lawson and William Wentworth across the Blue Mountains.

After the crossing in early December, they It then proceeded along a rivre course which Evans named Fish River. Evans also found and named Sugarloaf, O'Connell Plains and Macquarie Plains, the Campbell River and Macquarie Rivers and Bathurst and Mount Pleasant Plains.

The main river was called Wambool by the aborigines but Evans was unaware of this and named it after Governor Macquarie.

The party returned safely to the Nepean River on January 8, 1814.

Evans' favourable account of what he had found encouraged the Governor Lachlan Macquarie, to settle the "new country". He commissioned William Cox a magistrate and landowner of Windsor, to take a party of convicts and build a road from Emu Ferry to the Bathurst plains.

Work started on July 18 and the was completed by January 14, 1815. Much of the construction was difficult but in other places little more was required than to find the best line and make basic improvements to it. Even so Cox's party performed one of the greatest feats of labour in Australian history an effort that is almost miraculous.

Cox chose the site of Bathurst and It developed at the place on the banks of the Macquarie River where he located his depot, the terminus of the road party and it was there that Macquarie formally declared the settlement's existence.

Macquarie arrived on an inspection of the new road and depot on May 4, 1815 and on May 7 he assembled the whole population, raised the flag, ordered a volley to be fired, and the site of the future town of named in honour of the Secretary of State for War and the Colonies, Lord Bathurst.

Seventy-five people were present thirty-six had which he come with the Governor in his retinue and the others were convicts, soldiers and civil officers whose duties required them to reside at the depot.

The proclamation site was on the left bank of the river and around the flagpole and where the official settlement developed. When free settlers arrived they were restricted to the right (eastern) bank and so an unofficial village began to take shape to cater for the normal needs of the community.

Every years Bathurst celebrates Proclamation Day. MORE INFO 

The first group of agricultural grantees were James and John Blackman, Richard Neville. William Thomas Kite, Thomas John Godden George Cheshire and John Abbott, who were located on small farms along the river. They came in 1818. Macquarie favoured men of this kind, free settlers and ex-convicts of good character because he thought that ultimately they would serve the country better than the pastoralists.

They were supposed to be the first of many but Macquarie's policies were changed by his successor Sir Thomas Brisbane, and the expected numbers did not come.

The centre of the eastern village was the place where roads and tracks converged. The main ones were the road from Sydney which originally followed the Fish River and the Macquarie but soon struck across the plains from the crossing place where the village of O'Connell later developed; the track to the limekilns; and the road to the ford and the western bank of the Macquarie River. After 1827 these were joined by Major Sir Thomas Mitchell's new road from Mount Lambie, which is now the highway to Sydney. On the government side the earliest roads were towards the south and Queen Charlotte's Vale (now Perthville) but soon there were tracks leading north and west.

Bathurst Court House © Regional Showcase

The hot air ballooning capital of Australia - Canowindra

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ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
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Bathurst Information

Orange Visitor & Travel Guide

Bathurst Information
Interesting information and links about Bathurst and the Bathurst Region.


Kings Parade Bathurst Photo by Winam
Kings Parade - Photo by Winam


Abercrombie House Bathurst. Photo by denisbin
Historic Abercrombie House - Photo by denisbin


Population
Bathurst Regional Council area 44,000 people.


Weather
Average summer max. temperature 27, min. 12. Average winter max. temperature 12, min. 1.


Mt Panorama Bathurst
Mount Panorama - Photo by malakae


Elevation
Bathurst city 670 metres above sea level.
Mt Panorama 874 metres above sea level.


Longitude and latitude
East 149 degrees, 39.1 minutes, South 33 degrees, 24.6 minutes.


Bathurst Streetscape - Photo by Winam
Bathurst Streetscape - Photo by Winam


xpt photo
Photo by glenn5108


Transport

Coach
Australia Wide Coaches Ph 02 6362 7963
Daily service between Bathurst and Sydney.
Rail
Transport NSW TrainLink
Bathurst Railway Station Ph 02 6334 8600
Rail reservations Ph 13 22 32 or online www.nswtrainlink.info
Daily XPT and Bathurst Bullet and Road Coach services to and from Sydney. Coach connections to other destinations.
Taxi
Bathurst Taxis Ph 131 008
www.bathursttaxi.com.au



Road Scene Photo by amandabhslaterPhoto by amandabhslater

Traveling by road to downtown Bathurst - distances and times

Estimates based upon averaged traffic conditions in good weather.
Check online at Live Traffic for the latest road information.
Sydney CBD Great Western Highway and Katoomba 207 km - 3 hours
Sydney CBD Bells Line of Road and Bilpin 203 km - 3 hours
Canberra 251 km - 3h30m Orange 54 km - 42 minutes
Cowra 106 km - 1h15m Goulburn 190 km - 2h30m
Dubbo 205 km - 2h45m Mudgee 130 km - 1h45m
Newcastle 323 km - 4h15m
Wagga Wagga 322 km - 3h50m
Wollongong 258 km - 3h20m


Media
Newspapers
Western Advocate
163 George Street, Bathurst
Ph 02 6331 2611
www.westernadvocate.com.au
Bathurst City Life
Suite 1, Level 1, Crago Mill 2a Piper Street Bathurst
Ph 0467 200 245
www.bathurstcitylife.com.au
Radio
Stereo 2BS 1503AM
B-Rock 99.3FM ABC
Central West 96.7FM
Visitor Information 87.8FM
2MCE 92.3FM[/su_note]


Machattie Park Bathurst by smurfunMachattie Park -Photo by smurfun


CLICK FOR SYDNEY VISITOR GUIDE CLICK FOR ORANGE VISITOR GUIDE
The hot air ballooning capital of Australia - Canowindra

National Parks

Featured Region

ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE

Orange Visitor and Travel Guide. Visit Orange NSW and celebrate the region’s wine and food. Find out here about what to see and do and where to eat and stay. Art Gallery, Bed and Breakfast, Cafes and Coffee Shops, Caravan Parks, Events, Festivals, Guesthouses, Gardens, History, Holiday Cottages, Holiday Parks, Holidays, Hotels, National Parks, Markets, Motels, Museums, Produce, Restaurants, Self Catering, Services, Serviced Apartments, Shopping, Tourism, Tourist Guide, Tours and Drives,Travel, Villages, Wine, Wine Tasting, Wineries. Blayney, Canowindra, Carcoar, Molong, Millthorpe, Ophir, Mount Canobolas, Lake Canobolas, Orange Botanic Gardens, Conimbla National Park, Weddin Mountains National Park. Read More about “ORANGE TRAVEL GUIDE”

Journeys around NSW

  • The region has over 46 wineries and cellar doors for you to visit. Here we showcase some of the cool climate wines that are making the region famous. At many cellars doors, you will be able to meet the winemaker and hear of their passion for their wine and of our region. They will explain how our unique combination of altitude, cool climate, soils and topography provides Orange Region wines a unique point of difference.
  • It has attracted the rich and famous and those looking to escape life on the coast. Over the years it has welcomed Banjo Paterson, Henry Lawson, Fred Hollows and Dame Mary Durack and many more. You should see why!
  • Visit NSW and discover the states cities, towns and regions. Sydney Visitor Guide, Orange Region Visitor Guide, Bathurst Visitor Guide, North Coast, South Coast, Hunter, Central Coast and Country. Accommodation, events, shopping restaurants and more.
  • I don’t know if it is the altitude or the attitude but food does taste better in Orange. And if you marry your taste buds to a local wine such as Colmar Pinot Gris or a Brangayne Shiraz you will be in for a great food experience.
  • In Orange city and in the region, there are a plethora of amazing cafes. Some have recently opened, and there are many more on the horizon and the best of the original pioneers just get better.
List for free
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Bathurst

visit-bathurst-logo

bathurst travel guide

The best of Bathurst.
Things to see and do.

bathurst nsw photo
Bathurst Court House – Photo by sv1ambo

Chifley Home Bathurst photo
Chilfley Home – Photo by denisbin

Chifley Home and Education Centre
10 Busby Street, Bathurst
Ph 02 6333 6111
www.chifleyhome.org.au
Guided Tours Saturday, Sunday & Monday at 10am and 12pm
Admission – Adult $12, Senior $10, Child $8, Family $32

Former Prime Minister Ben Chifley’s home. Discover the life of one of Australia’s great Prime Ministers and the challenges of the 1940s in a World War II house museum. The Chifley Home was the only marital home of Prime Minister Ben Chifley and his wife, Elizabeth. Today, this modest semi-detached terrace still contains its original collection of household furnishings and personal effects dating back to when the Chifleys first occupied the house in 1914.

Abercrombie House photo
Abercrombie House – Photo by denisbin

> Abercrombie House
c. 1870s mansion, 311 Ophir Road. For opening times check with the Bathurst Visitor Information Centre.

> Miss Trail’s House
321 Russell Street. c. 1845. Administered by the NSW National Trust, the house and garden records the life and times of a Pioneer family. Open Tues – Sat. 1 pm to 3 Pm, Sunday l0 am to 3.30 Pm, Public holidays 1 pm to 3 pm.

Miss trail Bathurst nsw photo
Photo by sv1ambo

Australia’s oldest inland settlement
Bathurst is Australia’s oldest inland settlement has magnificent historic public buildings, beautiful parks and gardens and iconic memorials and monuments.
The Bathurst Regional Art Gallery and Australian Fossil and Mineral Museum have unique collections that are guaranteed to impress.
Lovers of history will enjoy great Australian Prime Minister Ben Chifley’s modest home and see the stream loco he drove when he worked on the railways. Miss Trails cottage is a National Trust treasure and Abercrombie House is an outstanding example of Victorian Tudor style architecture. However, the iconic best of all is the magnificent Bathurst Court House Australia’s best examples of Victorian-era public architecture designed by James Barnet. It opened in 1880 and still is in use today.
Reminders of the of the 1850s gold rush era abound in the city and in the surrounding villages such as Hill End and Sofala and they are now magnates for history buffs, fossickers, photographers and artists.
Nearby the world’s oldest caves allow you to explore you the wonders of the underground.
And motor racing enthusiasts will enjoy driving the circuit around Mount Panorama and the seeing the treasures inside the National Motor Racing Museum.

 

Bathurst Visitor Information Centre
1 Kendall Avenue, Bathurst, NSW 2795
Ph 02 6332 1444
www.visitbathurst.com.au
Open 9am – 5pm Daily Closed Christmas and Boxing Day

> Visit the Bathurst & District Historical Society’s Museum in Russell Street, at the eastern end of the Court House.

> Mount Panorama Motor Racing Circuit and the National Motor Racing Museum – open 9 am to 4.30 pm daily.

> Discover the Bathurst and Kelso Heritage Trails, or the Cobb & Co Trail. Details are available from the Bathurst Visitor Information Centre.

> Come and wonder at a bygone form of transport. A fully restored Cobb & Co coach is on display at the Bathurst Visitor Information Centre – open daily 9am to 5pm.

 

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